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goal of reconciliation. how much of that influenced other civil rights movements - in the u.s., for example. >> well, one of the things that is always interesting is it goes like this - that when you look at the civil rights movement, that it influenced other movements, particularly in south africa, and nelson mandela gave a tremendous amount of encouragement and credit to dr king, and the civil rights struggle. he paid whommage to that. what many don't see, it worked both way, there was an influence of reconciliation. the struggle weighed against apartheid, how he overcame that, but the spirit that nelson mandela governed in south africa and continued to energy us the still rights movement. when it came to los angeles in 1990, i was there and remember the energy from all the civil rights leaders in this city and other parts of the country. they saw nelson mandela not just as a foreign icon. but they saw him as one of them. so really the inspiration from nelson mandela, his leadership had a profound influence on the civil rights movement. >> i was going to ask you how it was
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
about the welfare for their schools or jobs or civil rights or civil liberties or the stalemate of suspicion suspicion, if that is what they mean by a liberal that i am proud to say i am a liberal. ashes teeeighteen and andrew write in their introduction they helped to kraft the words of this is what i meant to arthur to be liberal. bell letter chronicles historians views through the second the iraq war. u.k. and read letters from the roosevelt, truman, adelaide stevenson, humphrey, a candidate, kissinger, a william f. buckley, jr., the clinton, al gore gorby doll, jacqueline kennedy and naturally with his interest of american history sammy davis, jr., a and mick jagger. [laughter] to a detractor to accused arthur of being a communist sympathizer he said your first letter was a product of misunderstanding for you to really provide if not i can only send you to the nearest psychiatrist. but i should note arthur had a keen appreciation for andrew jackson and jack daniel's. as is also appreciated arthur did not believe white wine was done to the day given the difficulties of the af
for the release of a man the symbol of the civil rights movement. finally he walked out of prison. four years later he was elected south africa's first president. let's examine the man behind the status. our first guest had a strong connection. his grandfather taught mandela and his grandmother visited the south african leader in prison. it's a pleasure to have you here. i know you are the headmaster of the groten school. i'm glad you took time on what must be a hard day, given the family connections you had and you know him yourself. >> thank you for having me, i'm honoured to be here and i thank groten school for allowing me to be here. the man would have loved that. >> tell me about your family and connections to nelson mandela. >> my grandfather taught nelson mandela in college in social anthropology. they belonged to the anc, the same organization. my grandmother was also a political leader within the anc. >> and your grandmother then also was close to him and visited him in prison, and nelson mandela wrote her. >> several times, and my grandmother would write back. she told me she wrote
, their jobs, their civil rights and civil liberties -- someone who believes we can breakthrough the stalemate and suspicion that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by liberal, then i'm proud to say i'm a liberal. as andrew and stephen write in their introduction to their father's letters, arthur schlessinger jr. helped kennedy craft those words. the letters, which are a marvelous book, chronicles the late historian's views really from world war for through the -- world war ii through the second iraq war. you can read letters from adelaide stevenson, john kennedy, robert kennedy, henry kissinger, william f. buckley jr., al gore, gore vidal, jacqueline kennedy and naturally -- given arthur's interest in american history -- groucho marx, sammy davis jr. and bianca jagger. alexandra, arthur's wife, is not here, so we can mention that one. to a detractor who accused arthur of being a communist sympathizer, he wrote: the facts i have cited should relieve your mind. if not, i can only commend you to the nearest sigh psychiatris. [laughter] i should note quickly that arthur had
extraordinary work. is the songt thing "i'm in love with a big blue frog" is about civil rights. time,g blue frog at that show the pictures. why we can talk about need to have of voters rights and who the big blue frog's thetoday besides reappearance of racism in society, which exist. ♪ ♪ i'm in love with the big blue frog ♪ ♪ a big blue frog loves me he appears,s fat as he's got glasses and 6'3" ♪ ♪ i'm not worried about our kids ♪ out neat,hey'll turn they'll be good looking because they'll have my face, rates winters because they'll have his feet ♪ ♪ -- great swimmers because they'll have his feet ♪ ♪ i'm in love with the big blue frog ♪ ♪ he's got rhythm and a phd ♪ it's clear to me, it's probably clear to you ♪ theey say the values on property will go right down, the family next door is blue ♪ tavis: why a project aimed specifically at children? i mentioned you went to sandy hook. why a project aimed at children specifically for these issues? >> we have to interrupt the cycle of pushing the other way, you're no good, you're stupid, you're gay. this is cal
mandela died at the age of 95. mandela, a remarkable life dedicated his to fighting for civil rights in south africa. mandela lived long enough to see a multiracial democratic south africa. he called it the rainbow nation. the grief over his death crossed racial lines ha he devoted his to erasing. a young man at the age of 25, he joined the african national congress in 1956. mandela was arrested with 155 other political activists and was changed with high treason. the treason trial lasted 4 1/2 years. the charges against him were ultimately dropped. mandela used a false identity to evade the government and traveled to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leaders with sabotage and attempting to violently overthrow the government. the winner of 1964, mandela and his colleagues were sentenced to in prison. mandela's brutal imprisonment helped win freedom for his nation.
there is no civil rights struggle going on this country to make sure that poor people have lawyers. but it's something i really didn't understand when i started as a public defender. i started in a well resource office with manageable case loads and i was able to give clients with a gideon vision and then i moved to georgia for the statewide public defenders system in georgia and then i moved to new orleans in the wake of katrina to help rebuild that office and started to see what i experience nd dc was the exception and not the rule. for example i remember walking into a courtroom in new orleans, very first time ever walked into a courtroom in new orleans and there were people everywhere. people in suits you didn't know who the defenders were, you didn't know who the prosecutors were and you knew who the clients were because they were shackled on the seats. the judge started calling names and in the next second he would call another name and you heard voices, that would be the voice speaking for the person. a lawyer never stood next to the client and then the judge calls a name and there
it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about s
in the ranks of leadership of a civil rights group called the african national congress, the a.n.c. >> they were the revolutionaries of their day. they were the wild young men. >> teichner: former "time" magazine editor rick stengel spent countless hours in private conversation with mandela while collaborating on mandela's autobiography. >> mandela went to johannesburg as a young man and was treated in the terrible way that young black men were treated in the 1950s. i think this had a huge effect on him. >> teichner: mandela was in the forefront of growing resistance by the a.n.c., which began to protest the hated laws requiring blacks to carry passes, restricting where they could go. then, a galvanizing moment caught the world's attention. on march 21, 1960, in sharpeville, the peaceful civil rights movement was pierced with bullets. ( gunfire ) walter cronkite reported. >> police mounted on tanks opened fire. 69 natives were killed, 176 wounded. most of the victims were shot in the back. >> teichner: it was against this blood-red backdrop that nelson mandela took up arms. >>
people that really didn't experience the civil rights movement in the united states. they see this as a landscape of opportunity, and there is room for growth. and so i knew about that, as a young person, in the 90's and i grew up in the south, so in 90s in the south, you can still had a great deal of racial tension. and my parents made sure i knew about nelson, and i think my schoolmates did as welt. >> so it is so personal to so many people. including african-americans in the united states. because there are sort of in some ways parallel tracts. talk about the u.s., and apartheid in south africa, right? >> we picketed with with them. we were there. >> we appreciate it. and president obama has paid tribute to the life of nelson mandela as well. >> that swept college campuses at that time, the first time he ever spoke to a public audience, he had said many times was on behalf of nelson mandela and the antiapartheid movement. he came to the briefing room, he spoke very eloquently. here is more of what he had to say. >> at his trial in 1964. nelson mandela closed a statement fro
was just awed by this guy but in person he was more curious about the united states, the civil rights movement in this country than he was interested in talking about himself. again, that's evidence of what a curious mind is, what an open-minded person nelson mandela was. >> he got out of prison in 1990, well after the civil rights movement had undertaken in earnest in this country. he was fascinated by it. do you think he learned from it? >> he certainly did. one of the things that strikes me as you ask the question is that he was asking me about not only the civil rights movement. remember, there is a big difference in south africa the majority is black. in the united states the majority is white. mandela was fascinated with the idea that here in the united states black people were able to have a civil rights move lt and a nonviolent civil rights movement and achieve rights for themselves under the constitution. he was taken with the founding fathers. he knew about it. in south africa you have a majority black population, no constitution, no rights. he was curious how did that black
is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... ...you could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at experian.com america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
of south africa. many of us here in the civil rights movement this this country were involved in anti-apartheid movement and were involved in the free mandela movement. went to jail saying that south africa should be demock raitized. mandela should be free. they led those rallies and marches. i remember in 1994, i was part of the election that went over with other civil rights activists and we would actually be observers when the first election happened in south africa that election day and see an elected nelson mandela president. just being around him when he first came to this country and how he was before being president. any time you were around him, you had a sense you were in the presence of greatness. in the sense of searching around anybody else. nelson mandela had a gravity yet humility that was unmatched. the world has lot of someone who has literally changed world history. this is not just the first president or a first black president. this is one who led the evolution and revolution of a nation and became the first president and became a universal symbol of tolerance, of
at the end. asked what he i persuaded congrs to pass the four major legislatures involving civil rights. so on that count, which it achieved what johnson and chief? >> i don't think he ever would've had the kind of come the great society indeed and commitment that johnson had. because kennedy was essentially a foreign policy president. he used to say politics can ncj, but foreign policy can kill you. he would have gotten i think it would've run against barry goldwater, he would have won a big victory the way johnson it. he would have carried big majorities, democratic majorities into the house and senate i think. and i think he would've gotten the big tax cut, the federal aid to education, the medicare and the civil rights bills past. that would put them in the lead. the most, the rest of the 20th century presidential reformers, alongside of tr and wilson and even compared somewhat to fdr. i don't think he would have pushed beyond that. i think he would've pushed toward detente. i think we would have seen they don't earlier with kennedy family did with richard nixon, because that cuban miss
john lewis, democrat of georgia and civil rights leader. mr. lewis, thank you for being with us here tonight on this historic day. >> thank you very much, rachel, for having me, and thank you nar rich history, telling the story, what happened and how it happened. it is very moving. >> i have to ask, after your long career, especially as a young man in the south, in the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work inform your own? what has he meant to you over the years? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the vision, the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said, if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle and when i met him for the first time. he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what
of the years he now was experiencing. >> i was so struck by john lewis saying that as a young civil rights leader and activist, he was so influenced -- he and his fellow college students saying they were so influenced by mandela and mandela saying when they met that he had been following the civil rights movement in the united states. you were front and center as part of that movement, the civil rights movement here. you had that experience also in talking to him, the cross-fertilization of these freedom movements. >> yes, i think they fed off of each other. i think while the united states civil rights movement came of age and its victory much earlier than the apartheid struggle, they were very much alike. i think that's what enabled me, i think, to have the success to the extent i did to have it. i didn't go as a journalist going in an objective way, i was informed by the experiences we had in the south and in the united states. so when i got there, i understand. there were significant differences. in south africa the majority were the black people and they had been suppressed by a minori
. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the
district. i have always been passionate about civil rights, equality for everyone. i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality issues. i guess i have always been vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, i have to listen to other perspectives and making decisions. >> very soon there will be of much more seniors in that area. we are trying to focus on whether a stop sign or stoplight might help. >> tried to look at issues of senior nutrition programs, alzheimer's research, even housing policies that allowed our buildings to become more senior-friendly. also looking at how to support senior services, neighborhood- by-neighborhood programs that allow aging in place. people who are getting older helping each other stay in their homes and communities longer so that they can contribute as long as possible, as opposed to institutionalizing them. >> i support working families, livable communities, definite drawn support for the small business. even in my district, there are pockets of poverty and many people of work. so it is also a
, entertainment industry, but a and the civil-rights movement conspired to put a transparent the innocent man in prison -- present for the rest of his life. i had to ask myself why? and what i have chosen to do is to ask for basic questions why did this happen in? the second question is how transparent was george zimmerman innocent? how did these forces succeed to bring zimmerman to a trial and get him arrested? and fourth, what was the consequence of trying an innocent man and a county where he could expect a fair trial? let me start with the wise and i have to go back to the year 1920. the rest of to an italian-american gentleman arrested for the murder of a payroll clerk also an italian-american. they went to trial 1921 he was sentenced 15 years in prison nobody said anything about it that later they went to trial and had an interpreter and due process and went through the trial both were convicted in both transparently guilty. and in 19211 of the reporters the guys in this case throwback to his editor and said not much here. just a couple of logs in the jam then the aclu picks up the case
of civil rights in america. we'll tell you about that next. ♪ i've got you under my skin if you're seeing spots before your eyes... it's time... for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] only aveeno® has an active naturals total soy formula that instantly brightens skin. and helps reduce the look of brown spots in just 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. try it for a month. then go ahead and try to spot a spot. aveeno® positively radiant. naturally beautiful results. [ male announcer ] campbell's homestyle soup with farm grown veggies. just like yours. huh. [ male announcer ] and roasted white meat chicken. just like yours. [ male announcer ] you'll think it's homemade. i love this show. [ male announcer ] try campbell's homestyle soup. ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3 creepy gnomes ♪ 2 angry geese ♪ and a giant blow-up snowman ♪ that kind of freaks me out [ beep ] [ fem
care and in the environment for future generation. mayor ed lee began his career as a civil rights attorney he later served as a director of the human rights commission fighting for people then as director of the public works and later as city administrator now as mayor of san francisco he continues to fight by implementing services that help our most vulnerable community. i'd like to welcome to the stage the houshlg may have san francisco mayor ed lee. (clapping.) >> thank you very much. good evening, everybody and welcome to the people's palace. well, this is tonight i'm excited to be here it's an honor to be here to celebrate the ninth american heritage indian month no san francisco celebration of the awards. i wanted to thank not that all of you are here but for k q e d for the sponsoring of local heros. this is important because your city is all about diversity and i want to make sure that everybody can live here and be here and have good jobs and education and if they go out to the military they'll come back and give go opportunities for them. i have a special guest someone
have in the fight for civil rights, the faith we have, frankly, as a common family. >> i consider myself someone who shares the progress of value that need san francisco's -- many san franciscans hold dear. >> i do believe that a majority of this board share the same progressive values, and i think there is a danger and an overly narrow definition of what is progressive. we have to remember that being progressive stance for values of inclusiveness, of tolerance, of acceptance, and we need to think hard about how we characterize various votes of either being within that definition or outside of that. >> before i ran for office, i worked in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and a civil- rights attorney and really got to understand how much of a beacon to the rest of the world san francisco is for social justice. i also been spent a number of years helping to grow a small business, got to understand the innovative spirit here in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood association leader and also as the chair of an affordable housing organization and learned so m
civil rights violations. concord civil rights attorney said he doesn't comment on pending litigation, but the city will defend the lawsuit. joe vasquez, kpix5. >>> a quick-thinking witness led san leandro police to a trio of teens who snatched a woman's purse. a teen girl mugged the woman yesterday morning in the parking lot of the bay fair mall. but a witness saw the whole thing. >> she was kicked repeatedly and struck repeatedly and it was all for a purse that the suspect was trying to steal. >> the teen ran to a waiting car and it took off. police quickly caught up with the group in oakland. the victim is a little sore, but said to be all right. >> the man who killed a heyward high school student and shot at his friends has been convicted of murder. samuel shot to death in 2010 following a confrontation at a local park. prosecutors say the killer, 23- year-old, robert, got into a stare down and some of his friends. for some reason, he became upset, nava and his friends drove off, but ran into him a short time later. that's when yim shot at them. sentencing is scheduled for marc
about him and prayed for him all the years in prison. while the american civil rights movement was going on here in this country and here in los angeles. he came to visit the first ame churn only a few months after he was released from prison in south africa. they have pictures of him on the walls inside. it was a big moment for them here. we did get a chance earlier today to speak to one of the parishioners about meeting nelson mandela. >> i'll always remember that. what a blessing to meet this gentle man. more than anything in life, the one that taught us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive, but he told us to forgive. it's the most important asset of our life, to forgive and move on, yes. he is my hero. he is my papa. >> reporter: as you can tell, she, too, was born in aftrica bt been here for 27 years. they're remembering nelson mandela here today but remember him at the first ame church virtually forever. richelle. >> can you talk more about the special connection this church teams to nelson mandela? >> reporter: it's because he came here. his grandsons came her
rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work form your own? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. and when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i noknow all about you. i follow you. you inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they h
, almost like he was interviewing me about american politics and the civil rights movement. because in south africa, the majority of the population is black. he wanted to know, wait, how did a minority in the united states achieve civil rights? we ended up talking about, and he's fascinating with the founding fathers. the idea that george washington gives up power one term. something mandela later does. but also citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states. remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. in a sense, we were inspiring too nelson mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything when you sat down with him that really surpriseded you? i'm sure you prepared ahead of time and researched them and got to know the man through what you were able to read and hear from other personal anecdotes. what did you take away from it? >> i think the thing that surprised me the most is i was saying, you know, mr. mandela, you are a beacon to the world in terms of freedom, struggle, the sacrifice, the 27 years in jail, standing up for principle. he started l
of the bar a civil rights attorney at payer. thank you so much for joining me now first i wasn't talking about how you get your name on that less is the real bonafide way that the light that will tell them you're on that list while the government doesn't reveal officially to people whether they are on the list an anti black greasy usually happen is that a federal law enforcement agency. make little pro. not many people including us citizens to the watch list and then never revealed the reason for being included on the watch list or even officially let them know that they are on the list and there's just not really any sure fire way of these people finding out why they ended up on the list in the first weeks and i understand a muslim sounding names are more likely to be on that once was. because they are credible dress or that because it's more of a stereotype. while there's no reason to believe that just because somebody has a muslim name or muslim sounding name that they are more likely to be a threat in any kind of way. ahmed and the experience of the civil rights legal community we ar
as a young man in if south and the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandella's work inform you? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movemented and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the commitment, the dedication, the ings prags of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember as a young student in 1962, '63 and '64, we said if nelson mandella can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. when i met him for the first time, he said to me john lewis, i know all about you. i followed you. >> it was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. the struggle in birmingham is inseparable. trying to understand the importance of those decisions after sharkville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough, they had committed to nonviolence in a way that you had been so committed tlot your life and they decided that they needed that response, as well. how international were those discussions? >> here in america and around the world, there was on going discuss
>>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where pe
, i know from being a teenager in new york and the civil rights struggle going forward you were one of the first writers at "new york times" that really wrote about this movement. and for people to really understand the weight and gravity of nelson mandela, they have to understand what it was that he fought. give people a sense of what apartheid in south africa was and then how nelson mandela and the african national congress was able to break this gridlock of oppression and move this nation toward liberation. >> well, reverend al, i first went to south africa in 1985 which was one of the darkest times in the country where the apartheid regime was just wreaking havoc on black people in all of their townships. you know, the black people were isolated. they lived in townships that could easily be surrounded by the white and black in that case arms of the state. and this was a time when people were being beaten. they were being executed in all kinds of extralegal ways that we only learned about many years ago. with all kinds of poisons that their scientists, one doctor was a heart spec
, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. joining me charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend
in the civil rights and started hearing about what's going on in south africa, some of the leaders of sclc and others would go. it was considered a terrorist far left kind of course. and it was shunned. people would not discuss it in proper mainstream politics. and mandela was considered somebody who was an extreme cause that was in jail and you would see after awhile it evolved into a movement. but it was -- if it had not been for the randall robinsons and the maxine waters and the others that paid a price that built up a movement, a movement of civil disobedience long before it became a cause and started pushing for sanctions and getting artisan athletes to boycott. had it not been because of that movement, it never would have became the movement it was in the united states. >> the national credibility that was lent to it by having those names you mentioned. and charlayne, as you have covered as a journalist, as an activist, you have known nelson mandela since he has been out of prison. and we know that experience certainly like it would for anybody, it changed him. what people don't und
politics and the american civil rights movement. in south africisa the majority the population is black and hert white. he wanted to know how did a minority end up achieving civilh rights. he's fasecinated with the founding fathers. it's something mandela also does. but also, citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states.uth remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. so we were inspiring to nelson t mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything that really surprised you? i'm sure you prepare add head of time and researched him and gota to know the man through what you were able to read and hear through other personal ane anecdotes. >> i said you are a beacon to the world in terms of the sacrifice and 27 years in jail. standing up for principal: he started laughing. i was taken aback. i thought he's not understanding this american guy, you know? but he said no.wa it's when he was growing up all he wanted to do was rebel against his parents. hewa wanted to get out of the b tribal situation. he was like a prince and go to the big city of johannesburg.
-racist, non-sexist country which certainly has a compatible legacy in our country's dr. king and civil rights movement here, which it's interesting there was a symbiosis between the civil rights movement and south african movement, they took a tremendous amount of inspiration from dr. king in the civil rights movement in the united states, if you think about 196 3, he went to prison in 1964. >> there is no doubt which gets me to the next question from professor ogletree, in terms of the impact that the anti parti movement around the world had and here in the united states had on the end of a paratide, how significant was it? >> it was very significant. remember, anderson, this was during the regan administration and ronald reagan opposed what we were doing and have towed issues to talk about opening up the system in south africa to end the partide. thousands of people got arrested in washington d.c. and i got a group of lawyers together to represent them for nothing. they were released and not charged with an offense. it was a national issue, black, white, male, female, people on the left, ri
. >> nelson mandela's life work extended behind the native south africa. we sat with civil rights leader the reverend jessie jackson, and he drew parallels with his movement and the struggle in the u.s. >> there was a sameness about the struggle there and here. both faced persecution in 1953. king was gaoled and bricked and stabbed at 39. nelson mandela was gaoled and put on the terrorist list by the u.s. government and emerged as a moral authority, both have that moral character. barack obama on the other hand - he was the ben factor of the struggles. he's a generation behind. >> nelson mandela and the king were transformative figures. >> we saw a picture of you and nelson mandela with one of my colleagues, morgan radford, who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew. >> i must say when i was in cape down south africa, he was released. immediately he recognised me and called my name. i was overwhelmed. he knew it was going on. he was current, alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day, he wrote it. he also was a great debater
had been partly -- part of a civil rights movement and fought against jim crow, which is our apartheid in america. we appreciated someone who was rising above the situation in south africa so the world could know. for many years their struggle was going on and nobody was listening. >> absolutely. you wrote in your piece on nelson mandela to the very end, he was frail and somewhat forgiveful and remained the father of the nation for south africans and in several trips he made to the hospital over the past two years, he was in his own way preparing his family biological and extended, for his final return home. he was 95. we know this life is not permanent in this form here. when you -- the news broke, despite his age and despite knowing his health situation, no one wanted to let him go for what he represented, even though that continues as he's passed away. >> i think so many people wish it could continue even more intensely. but i've got rn e-mails from friends in south africa who were doctor and people who like you said watched his progression and they say even though -- they've been w
thurners candles and stood with others praying for the civil rights leader. there were scenes like this across sfrikdz today. more now from al jazeera nick schifrin. >> nelson mandela talked about a rainbo nation. his struggle wasn't on behalf of black south africans but on behalf of all segregated and humiliated by racist rulers. >> nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. citizens of all races and religion say mandela created that had unity. at an interfaith service, south africans celebrated the respect that mandela provided them. >> celebrate. it's an important model for human society. >> it lions us to be. >> down the road at an indian rally, man dela was thanked on behalf of children. 20 years ago, perussia was a second-class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks. >> we were part of the deprived lot. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to find something to eat. we had to say to the guy. sorry, do you sell to us? he would say, no we don't but you guys can go a
. >>> four u.s. presidents are headed to south africa to pay final respects to civil rights legend nelson mandela. president obama and first lady michelle obama departed on air force one just a short time ago. tomorrow's memorial service will also serve as a rare reunion for nearly all of the living american presidents. >>> kpix5cate courigan is in the news room. a real security challenge. >> reporter: 8000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and authorities say thousands of police officers will be on hand. right now, a memorial outside of mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africa's that have come together since the death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a johannesburg soccer stadium. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he'll attend the massive public memorial. former president's bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings of world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> reporter: the he
to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reunite with their families. but at the time the direction connect to the history of the city being a city of immigrants 35 percent of all the small businesses in san francisco was owned by an immigrant. our whole history this city's been built on good immigrants who found ideas and employed others. and today that story has not changed. i think that the businesses in succeed if we have good sound business policies but we make sure there's comprehensive immigration reform. because we've he learned over the years is that there are millions of people in the state of california and undocumented folks in san francisco that are not part of our official economy that are hiding. because of fear that will not participate in health prevention because of fear. because of that we have to have an immigration policy it is forward-looking and make sure there's a path to censorship[p. we're in a worldwide talent war. are we going to lose to other great cities or are we going to make sure we're getting the talent. i know the conversations are a bit sensitive
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
that will nelson mandela set. >> want to bring in andrew young, civil rights leader and former ambassador to the united nations. welcome, as well as james joseph, former u.s. ambassador to south africa and duke university professor, both of who new mandela very well on a personal level. ambassador, i'd like to start with you. you draw parallels. you talk about how this was so important, so significant in some ways to the civil rights movement and the struggle at the time. for us, i was a college student when we had a lot of those divest from the from the south africa shantytowns in the yards of the campuses. tell us the connected you had with the civil rights movement. >> understood that as dr. king said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. and so we knew of chief albert la tooley and the african national crisis. we entertained oliver tambo and mbeki when they were in exile. but my first real conflict, i went to south africa with arthur ashe in 1974 to play tennis. we tried to seaman della and didn't but we saw robert subuqwai who had just gotten out of jail and we start
was a protest against apartheid. >> and it's interesting, he being too young for the civil rights era, reverend jackson, but first to charles ogletree, this was the connection point was apartheid. this was the inspiration nelson mandela, who he could experience realtime, the joy of that deliverance realtime. >> that's exactly right. i was a student at stanford when i heard the movement about divestment from south africa in 1972. in 1971, barack obama was only ten years old so he was very young and never able to appreciate that. what i want to make clear, though, we shouldn't call him militant, we shouldn't call him a terrorist, he's a patriot. he's just like the patriots fighting here many, many centuries ago for equality. and that's what he was. he was a patriot who tried to make sure that his country where he was born, where he controlled would recognize the fact that the majority of people who were african were suppressed by the minority of people who were white, and that has to be changed. he is a patriot who did a great deal in his 27 years in prison and did a great deal as president and c
washington. >>> president obama is making a long trip from washington to south africa to honor civil rights legend nelson mandela. tomorrows memorial service will serve as a rare reunion of nearly all of the living american presidents. kpix5 is in the news room now and the number of dig any tar its i imagine is giving south african police quite a security challenge. >> reporter: yes, frank. more than 80,000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and thousands of police officers will be on hand and right now a memorial outside nelson mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africans who have come together since his death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a soccer stadium tomorrow. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he will attend the massive public memorial. former presidents bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings the world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> the head of south africa's nati
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